DRN Air Spaces

  1. Types and Categories Airspace
    Image Upload 1
  2. Airspace Categories (2)
    • 1) Regulatory  
    •      - FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) regulations are in place
    • 2) Nonregulatory
    •      - FAA regulations are NOT in place
  3. Regulatory Categories (7)
    • 1) Class A
    • 2) Class B
    • 3) Class C
    • 4) Class D
    • 5) Class E
    • 6) Restricted
    • 7) Prohibited
  4. Nonregulatory Categories (4)
    • 1) MOAs
    • 2) Warning
    • 3) Alert
    • 4) Controlled Firing Areas
  5. Airspace Types (4)
    Within these 2 categories (Regulatory and Nonregulatory), there are 4 types

    • 1) Controlled
    • 2) Uncontrolled
    • 3) Special use
    • 4) Other airspace
  6. Controlled type of Air Space (4)
    Defined dimensions within which Air Traffic Control (ATC) service

    • 1) Class B      0 – 10,000’
    • 2) Class C      Airport Elevation - 1,200’ – 1,400’
    • 3) Class D      Airport Elevation - 2,500’
    • 4) Class E      1,200’ - 18,000’ - Class A - 60,000’+
  7. Uncontrolled Type Airspace
    Class G
  8. Special Use Type Airspace (6)
       - or
    - or Special Area of Operation (SAO)

    • - Instrument Carts of Special Use Airspace include
    •      - area name or number
    •      - effective altitude
    •      - time and weather conditions of operation    
    •      - controlling agency
    •      - chart panel location

    • 1) Prohibited areas
    • 2) Restricted areas
    • 3) Warning areas
    • 4) Military operation areas (MOAs)
    • 5) Alert areas
    • 6) Controlled firing areas (CFAs)
  9. Other Types airspace (7)
    • 1) Local airport advisory (LAA)
    • 2) Military training route (MTR)
    • 3) Temporary flight restriction (TFR)
    • 4) Parachute jump aircraft operations
    • 5) Published VFR routes
    • 6) Terminal radar service area (TRSA)
    • 7) National security area (NSA)
  10. Image Upload 2
    Class B Inner Circle: CFS-7,000
  11. Image Upload 3
    Class B Outer Circle: 1,800-7,000
  12. What Air Space Class from the surface up to 10,000’ MSL?
    Class B
  13. What Air Space Class surrounding the nation’s busiest airports?
    Class B
  14. What Air Space Class contains all IFR operations?
    Class B
  15. Class B
       - elevations
       - surrounding
       - IFR operations
       - ATC authorization
    • Regulatory Category / Controlled Type
    •    - from the surface to 10,000’ MSL
    •    - surrounding the nation’s busiest airports (JFK)
    •    - consists of a surface area and two or more layers
    •    - contains all IFR operations
    •    - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
    • Image Upload 4      Image Upload 5
    • Class B Inner Circle: CFS-7,000    Image Upload 6

    • Class B Outer Circle: 1,800-7,000 Image Upload 7
  16. Inner Circle of Class C
    • - radius = 5 NM
    • - elevation - SFC-1,200'
  17. Outer Circle of Class C
    • - radius 10 NM 
    • - elevation - 1,200-4,000 feet above the airport elevation
  18. Image Upload 8
    Class C Inner Circle: SFC-4,200
  19. Image Upload 9
    Class C Inner Circle: 2,100-4,200
  20. Class C Inner Circle
       - radius?
       - elevation?
    • - radius = 5 NM
    • - elevation - SFC-1,200'
  21. Class C Outer Circle
       - radius?
       - elevation?
    • - radius 10 NM 
    • - elevation - 1,200-4,000 feet above the airport elevation
  22. What Air Space Class surrounding smaller airports?
    Class C
  23. What Air Space Class elevation from CSF up to 4,000' above airport elevation?
    Class C
  24. What Air Space Class contains a certain number of IFR operations?
    Class C
  25. Class C
       - elevations
       - surrounding
       - IFR operations
       - Inner Circle
       - Outer Circle
       - ATC authorization
    • Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    •    - from the surface to 4,000’ above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
    •    - surrounding smaller airports
    •       - have an operational control tower
    •       - serviced by a radar approach control
    •       - have a certain number of IFR operations 
    •    - Inner Circle
    •       - radius = 5 NM
    •       - elevation - SFC-1,200'
    •    - Outer Circle
    •       - radius 10 NM 
    •       - elevation - 1,200-4,000 feet above the airport elevation
    •    - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
    • Image Upload 10     Image Upload 11
    • Class C Inner Circle: SFC-4,200   Image Upload 12

    • Class C Outer Circle: 2,100-4,200    Image Upload 13
  26. Image Upload 14
    Ceiling of Class D Airspace = 4,000 feet
  27. What Air Space Class elevation from CSF up to 2,500' above airport elevation?
    Class D
  28. What Air Space Class surrounding small airports?
    Class D
  29. For what Air Space Class IFR operations must be published to contain the procedures?
    Class D
  30. Class D
       - elevation
       - surrounding
       - IFR operations
       - ATC authorization
    • Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    •    - from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
    •    - surrounding small airports that have or not an operational control tower
    •    - IFR operations must be published to contain the procedures
    •    - arrival extensions for IAPs may be Class D or Class E airspace
    •    - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
    • Image Upload 15   Image Upload 16   
    • Ceiling 4,000           Image Upload 17
  31. Mountainous Terrain
    • - area of changing terrain profile where the changes of terrain
    • elevation exceed 3,000' (900 m) within a distance of 10 NM 18,5 km
    • Image Upload 18
  32. If charts do not depict a class E base
    from - to?
    - from 14,500’ MSL to, but not including, 18,000’ MSL
  33. If charts depicts a class E base
    bases?
    • - bases below 14,500’ MSL and could be...
    •       - base = SFC               Image Upload 19
    •       - base = 700’ AGL       Image Upload 20
    •       - base = 1,200’ AGL     Image Upload 21
  34. All airspace above FL 600, the ceiling of Class A airspace is...
    Class E
  35. Class E also including (6)
    • 1) 48 contiguous states
    • 2) Alaska
    • 3) District of Columbia (Washington, D.C)
    • 4) Waters within nautical 12 miles from the coast (Territorial Waters)
    • 5) All airspace above FL 600 (60,000 MSL - the ceiling of Class A airspace)
    • 6) Federal Airways, which are shown as blue lines
  36. What class is District of Columbia (Washington, D.C)?
    Class E
  37. What class is Alaska?
    Class E
  38. What class is waters within nautical 12 miles from the coast?
    Class E
  39. What class are Federal Airways, which are shown as blue lines
    Class E
  40. Class E excluding (2)
    • - Alaska Peninsula west of longitude 160˚00'00''W
    • - airspace below 1,500 feet above the surface of the earth unless specifically designated lower (for example in mountainous terrain higher than 13,000' MSL)
  41. Remote pilot will NOT need ATC authorization to operate in what classes?
    • Class G
    • Class E (most of the time)
  42. Remote pilot will need ATC authorization to operate in what classes?
    • Class B - must
    • Class C -must
    • Class D - must
    • Class E - sometimes)
  43. Class E
       - FL 600
       - if charts do not depict a class E base
       - if charts depicts a class E base
       - Including
       - Excluding
       - ATC authorization
    • Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    • - airspace over the United States

    1,200’ MSL - 18,000’ MSL - Class A - 60,000’ MSL+

    - all airspace above FL 600 (60,000 MSL) - the ceiling of Class A airspace

    • - if charts do not depict a class E base
    •    - from 14,500’ MSL to, but not including, 18,000’ MSL 

    • - if charts depicts a class E base
    •    - bases below 14,500’ MSL and could be...
    •       - base = 1,200’ AGL
    •       - base is either the surface or 700’ AGL

    • - Including
    •    - 48 contiguous states
    •    - District of Columbia (Washington, D.C) and Alaska
    •    - waters within nautical 12 miles from the coast (Territorial Waters)
    • - Federal Airways, which are shown as blue lines

    • - Excluding
    •    - Alaska Peninsula west of longitude 160˚00'00''W
    •    - airspace below 1,500 feet above the surface of the earth unless specifically designated lower (for example in mountainous terrain higher than 13,000' MSL)

    • - in MOST CASES, a remote pilot will not need ATC authorization
    • Image Upload 22  
    • Class E     SFC-18,000            Image Upload 23
    • Class E     700-18,000          Image Upload 24
    • Class E     1,200-18,000       Image Upload 25

  44. Uncontroled Category of Airspace (1)
    Class G   0 - 1,200
  45. What class is from the surface to the base of the overlying Class E airspace?
    Class G
  46. Class G
       - from ___ to ____
       - ATC authorization
    • Unregulatory / Uncontrolled Airspace
    •    - 0 – 700’ or 1,200’ or 14,500
    •    - from the surface to the base of the overlying Class E airspace
    •    - the presence of an airport reduces the maximum height of a Class G airspace
    •    - Class G airspace can extend 1,200’ from ground level, even on a mountain peak over 10,000’ high
    •    - remote pilot will not need ATC authorization to operate in Class G
    • Image Upload 26
  47. Image Upload 27
    • Class B Airspace
    • - nation’s busiest airports (JFK)
    • - from the surface to 10,000’ MSL
  48. Image Upload 28
    • Class C Airspace
    •    - surrounding smaller airports
    •    - surface area with 5 NM radius
    •    - outer circle with 10 NM radius that extends from 1,200 to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation
    • - from the surface to 4,000’ above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
  49. Image Upload 29
    Class D Airspace

    - from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
  50. Image Upload 30
    Class E       SFC-18,000
  51. Image Upload 31
    Class E     1,200-18,000
  52. Image Upload 32
    Class E       700-18,000
  53. Image Upload 33
    - What king of Airspace?
    - From-To?
    - what airport?
    - IFR operations?
    - authorization from ATC?
    • Class C
    •      Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    • - from the surface to 4,000’ above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
    • - surrounding smaller airports 
    •     - has an operational control tower
    •     - serviced by a radar approach control
    •     - surface area with 5 NM radius
    •     - outer circle with 10 NM radius that extends from 1,200 to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation
    • - have a certain number of IFR operations 
    • - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
  54. Image Upload 34
    - What king of Airspace?
    - From-To?
    - what airport?
    - IFR operations?
    - authorization from ATC?
    • Class B
    •       Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    • - from the surface to 10,000’ MSL
    • - surrounding the nation’s busiest airports (JFK)
    •     - consists of a surface area and 2 or more layers
    •     - have an operational control tower
    • - contains all IFR operations
    • - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
  55. Image Upload 35

    - What king of Airspace?
    - From-To?
    - what airport?
    - IFR operations?
    - authorization from ATC?
    • Class D
    •       Regulatory / Controlled Airspace
    • - from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
    • - surrounding airports that have an operational control tower
    • - when IFR are published, the airspace is normally designed to contain the procedures
    •      - arrival extensions for IAPs may be Class D or Class E airspace
    • - remote pilot must receive authorization from ATC
  56. Airspace from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
    • Class D        
    • Regulatory Category / Controlled Type
  57. In which airspace when IFR are published, the airspace is normally designed to contain the procedures
    • Class D        
    • Regulatory Category / Controlled Type
  58. In which airspace arrival extensions for IAPs (Instrument Approach Procedures) may be Class D or Class E airspace?
    • Class D        
    • Regulatory Category / Controlled Type
  59. If charts do not depict a class E base from ___ to, but ___
    from 14,500’ MSL to, but not including, 18,000’ MSL
  60. If other charts depict all locations of Class E airspace, base can be ___ or ___or ___
    base is 1,200’ AGL or 700’ AGL or surface
  61. Class E includes:
    • - 48 contiguous states
    • - District of Columbia (Washington, D.C) and Alaska
    • - waters within nautical 12 miles from the coast (Territorial Waters)
    • - all airspace above FL 600 (60,000 MSL - the ceiling of Class A airspace)
    • - Federal Airways, which are shown as blue lines
  62. Which Airspace can be from 0 to 700’ or 1,200’ or 14,500
    • Class G
    • Uncontrolled
  63. Class G can be from ___ to ___
    • - if charts do not depict a class E base, 0 - 14,500’ MSL
    • - if charts depict a class E base, 0 - 1,200' AGL or - 700' AGL
  64. Prohibited Areas
    Regulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •       - “P” followed by a number (e.g., P-40)
    •       - flight of aircraft is prohibited
    •       - for security or other reasons associated with the national welfare
    •       - Example: Washington, D.C.
    • Image Upload 36
  65. Restricted areas
    Regulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •       - “R” followed by a number (e.g., R-4401) with altitude or Flight Level (FL) being flown
    •       - operations are hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft (artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles)
    •       - not wholly prohibited
    •       - activities must be confined (ограниченный) because of their nature

    • - If area is NOT active
    •       - released to the FAA
    •       - ATC allows the aircraft to operate without issuing specific clearance

    • - If restricted area is active
    •       - has not been released to the FAA
    •       - ATC facility issues a clearance to avoids the restricted airspace
    • Image Upload 37
  66. Warning areas
    Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •       - “W” followed by a number (e.g., W-237)
    •       - similar to restricted areas, but
    •             - US government does not have sole jurisdiction over the airspace
    •       - extending from 3 NM outward from the coast of the United States
    •       - to warn nonparticipating pilots of the potential danger
    •       - may be located over domestic or international waters or both
    • Image Upload 38
  67. Military operation areas (MOAs)
    Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •      - MOAs are not numbered (e.g., “Camden Ridge MOA”)
    •      - MOA defined on the back of the sectional charts with
    •           - times of operation
    •           - altitudes affected
    •           - controlling agency
    •      - vertical and lateral limits
    •      - to separate military training activities from IFR traffic
    •      - nonparticipating IFR traffic may be cleared through an MOA if IFR separation can be provided by ATC
    •                - otherwise,
    •      - ATC reroutes or restricts nonparticipating IFR traffic
    • Image Upload 39
  68. Alert areas
    Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •      - “A” followed by a number (e.g., A-211)
    •      - to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or an unusual type of aerial activity
    •      - pilots should exercise caution in alert areas
    •      - all activity within an alert area shall be conducted in accordance with regulations and w/o waiver
    •      - pilots of participating aircraft, as well as pilots transiting the area, shall be equally responsible for collision avoidance
    • Image Upload 40
  69. Controlled firing areas (CFAs)
    Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •      - no need to chart CFAs since they do not cause a nonparticipating aircraft to change its flight path
    •      - activities that, if not conducted in a controlled environment, could be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft
    •      - activities must be suspended when a spotter aircraft, radar, or ground lookout position indicates an aircraft might be approaching the area
  70. Image Upload 41
    • Prohibited areas
    • Regulatory Category / Special Use Type
    •       - “P” followed by a number (e.g., P-40)
    •       - flight of aircraft is prohibited
    •       - for security or other reasons associated with the national welfare
    •       - Example: Washington, D.C.
  71. Image Upload 42
    • Restricted areas
    • Regulatory Category / Special Use Type
    •       - “R” followed by a number (e.g., R-4401)
    •       - operations are hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft (artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles)
    •       - not wholly prohibited
    •       - activities must be confined (ограниченный) because of their nature

    • - If area is NOT active
    •       - released to the FAA
    •       - ATC allows the aircraft to operate without issuing specific clearance

    • - If area is active
    •       - has not been released to the FAA
    •       - ATC facility issues a clearance to avoids the restricted airspace
  72. Image Upload 43
    • Warning areas
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •       - “W” followed by a number (e.g., W-237)
    •       - similar to restricted areas, but
    •             - US government does not have sole jurisdiction over the airspace
    •       - extending from 3 NM outward from the coast of the United States
    •       - to warn nonparticipating pilots of the potential danger
    •       - may be located over domestic or international waters or both
  73. Image Upload 44
    • Military operation areas (MOAs)
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •      - MOAs are not numbered (e.g., “Camden Ridge MOA”)
    •      - MOA defined on the back of the sectional charts with
    •           - times of operation
    •           - altitudes affected
    •           - controlling agency
    •      - vertical and lateral limits
    •      - to separate military training activities from IFR traffic
    •      - nonparticipating IFR traffic may be cleared through an MOA if IFR separation can be provided by ATC
    •                - otherwise,
    •      - ATC reroutes or restricts nonparticipating IFR traffic
  74. Image Upload 45
    • Alert areas
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type

    •      - “A” followed by a number (e.g., A-211)
    •      - to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or an unusual type of aerial activity
    •      - pilots should exercise caution in alert areas
    •      - all activity within an alert area shall be conducted in accordance with regulations and w/o waiver
    •      - pilots of participating aircraft, as well as pilots transiting the area, shall be equally responsible for collision avoidance
  75. Flight of aircraft is prohibited for security or other reasons associated with the national welfare
    • Prohibited areas
    • Regulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • - “P” followed by a number (e.g., P-40)
  76. Operations are hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft (artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles), but airspace within which the flight of aircraft, while not wholly prohibited
    • Restricted areas
    • Regulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • “R” followed by a number (e.g., R-4401) with altitude or Flight Level (FL) being flown
  77. Area in which US government does not have sole jurisdiction over the airspace that extending from 3 NM outward from the coast of the United States
    • Warning areas
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • “W” followed by a number (e.g., W-237)
  78. Area that defined on the back of the sectional charts with times of operation, altitudes affected, and the controlling agency with vertical and lateral limits
    • Military operation areas (MOAs)
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • MOAs are not numbered (e.g., “Camden Ridge MOA”)
  79. Area to separate certain military training activities from IFR traffic
    • Military operation areas (MOAs)
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • MOAs are not numbered (e.g., “Camden Ridge MOA”)
  80. Area to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or an unusual type of aerial activity
    • Alert areas
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • “A” followed by a number (e.g., A-211)
  81. Area in which pilots of participating aircraft, as well as pilots transiting the area, shall be equally responsible for collision avoidance
    • Alert areas
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
    • “A” followed by a number (e.g., A-211)
  82. Area that no need to chart CFAs since they do not cause a nonparticipating aircraft to change its flight path
    • Controlled firing areas (CFAs)              
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
  83. Area in which activities must be suspended when a spotter aircraft, radar, or ground lookout position indicates an aircraft might be approaching the area
    • Controlled firing areas (CFAs)              
    • Nonregulatory Category / Special Use Type
Author
flashsmilenet
ID
355389
Card Set
DRN Air Spaces
Description
DRN Air Spaces
Updated