BLISTER BEETLES PHE 02

  1. BLISTER BEETLES
    There are no known BLANK and BLANK that effectively control blister beetles.
    known predators or parasites
  2. BLISTER BEETLES
    are attracted to blooming BLANK
    ALFALFA
  3. BLISTER BEETLES
    to reduce the incidence of blister beetles in alfalfa, cut hay before peak BLANK
    cut hay before peak bloom
  4. BLISTER BEETLES
    Alfalfa fields near natural areas or rangelands may have higher levels of blister beetles due to
    the availability of BLANK egg pods OR BLANK bees in these undisturbed areas.
    grasshopper egg pods or ground-nesting bees
  5. BLISTER BEETLES
    Alfalfa fields near natural areas or rangelands may have higher levels of blister beetles due to
    the availability of grasshopper egg pods or AND BLANK in these undisturbed areas.
    grasshopper egg pods or ground-nesting bees
  6. BLISTER BEETLES
    Alfalfa fields near natural areas or rangelands may have higher levels of blister beetles due to
    the availability of BLANK OR ground nesting bees in these undisturbed areas.
    grasshopper egg pods or ground-nesting bees
  7. BLISTER BEETLES
    are also found on the edge of the field or BLANK BLANK BLANK within the field.
    field or congregated in groups within the field.
  8. BLISTER BEETLES
    Skip the edge of the field when
    cutting
  9. BLISTER BEETLES
    pick up the bales on the edge of the field separately and BLANK them from the rest of the field.
    isolate them from the rest of the field.
  10. BLISTER BEETLES
    No treatment thresholds have been established for blister beetles and BLANK BLANK generally are not needed
    insecticide applications generally are not needed.
  11. BLISTER BEETLES
    are among the largest beetles likely to be found in a sweep net sample in BLANK
    ALFALFA
  12. BLISTER BEETLES
    Blister beetles have an BLANK and BLANK life cycle
    unusual and complex life cycle.
  13. BLISTER BEETLE metamorphosis?
    complete
  14. BLISTER BEETLES
    deposit clusters of eggs in depressions in the
    soil
  15. BLISTER BEETLES
    larvae (called triungulin) seek out subterranean eggs of BLANK BLANK bees to complete development.
    eggs of ground-nesting bees to complete development.
  16. BLISTER BEETLES
    larvae (called triungulin) seek out subterranean INSECT egg pods or eggs of ground-nesting bees to complete development.
    grasshopper egg pods or eggs of ground-nesting bees to complete development.
  17. BLISTER BEETLES
    The triungulin of some species of blister beetles "hitch a ride" back to the hive with INSECTS
    adult bees to feed on bee eggs.
  18. BLISTER BEETLES
    do not cause widespread feeding damage to
    alfalfa
  19. BLISTER BEETLES
    they contain a chemical, cantharidin, which is toxic to
    livestock.
  20. BLISTER BEETLES
    Cantharidin is contained in the BLANK
    (blood) of the beetles
  21. BLISTER BEETLES
    Cantharidin can contaminate forage directly, when beetles killed during harvest are incorporated into
    baled hay, or indirectly, by transfer of the BLANK from crushed beetles onto forage.
    baled hay, or indirectly, by transfer of the hemolymph from crushed beetles onto forage.
  22. BLISTER BEETLES
    ANIMALS are particularly susceptible to the toxic effects of cantharidin.
    HORSES
  23. BLISTER BEETLES
    Consuming as few as NUMBER beetles can kill a horse.
    SIX BEETLES
  24. BLISTER BEETLES
    As long as blister beetles are alive and healthy, they can BLANK the field, minimizing hay contamination.
    leave the field
  25. BLISTER BEETLES
    The best way to reduce the risk of poisoning is to
    avoid killing them.
  26. BLISTER BEETLES
    inspection of hay bales before feeding them to horses can reduce the likelihood of blister beetle poisoning, but
    this task is BLANK AND BLANK
    difficult and time-consuming
  27. BLISTER BEETLES
    No insecticides have enough BLANK ACTIVITY to kill blister beetles from the time sprays are applied up until harvest.
    residual activity
  28. BLISTER BEETLES
    Because of the aggregative and restless nature of
    blister beetles, BLANK CONTROL of blister beetles in
    alfalfa may not be desirable.
    chemical control
  29. BLISTER BEETLES
    dead beetles that remain in alfalfa foliage may render the hay BLANK
    Dead beetles on the ground (or their cantharidin) can be BLANK BLANK into the hay
    • toxic
    • transferred back into the hay.
  30. BLISTER BEETLES
    The second THROUGH BLANK hay cuttings are at greatest risk of blister beetle contamination
    second through fourth
  31. BLISTER BEETLES
    The BLANK THROUGH fourth hay cuttings are at greatest risk of blister beetle contamination
    second through fourth
  32. BLISTER BEETLES
    Adult blister beetles forage for a few weeks, mate, and then
    deposit eggs in the BLANK
    soil
  33. BLISTER BEETLES
    Livestock usually come into contact with blister beetles by consuming
    alfalfa hay containing BLANK BLANK
    dead beetles.
  34. BLISTER BEETLES
    Once contaminated, hay does not lose toxicity.
    Cantharidin does not break down when heated or BLANK
    heated or dried.
  35. BLISTER BEETLES
    Once contaminated, hay does not lose toxicity.
    Cantharidin does not break down when BLANK or dried
    heated or dried.
  36. BLISTER BEETLES
    cantharidin is secreted by the male blister beetle and given to the female as a copulatory gift during
    MATING
  37. BLISTER BEETLES
    Symptoms of cantharidin poisoning include blood in the urine, abdominal pain, and
    rarely prolonged erections
  38. BLISTER BEETLES
    potentially fatal. Ingesting cantharidin can initially cause severe damage to the lining of the
    gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, and may also cause permanent BLANK damage
    gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, and may also cause permanent renal damage
Author
ianquinto
ID
351705
Card Set
BLISTER BEETLES PHE 02
Description
BLISTER BEETLES PHE 02
Updated