BEETLES PHE 02

  1. BEETLES
    Human health problems caused by beetles include
    • skin, eye, ear, and nose irritations; respiratory allergies; and
    • minor gastrointestinal discomfort.
  2. BEETLES
    The greatest human discomfort associated with beetles
    is caused by vesicating species that secrete irritating chemicals when the insects are
    handled or accidentally contact human skin or sense organs.
  3. BEETLES
    Blister beetles, false blister beetles, some rove beetles, and some
    darkling beetles have these irritants in their
    irritants in their secretions, hemolymph, or body parts.
  4. BEETLES
    Larvae of larder beetles are covered with
    hairs that can act as skin or respiratory allergens.
  5. BEETLES
    Invasion of body tissues by beetle larvae is called C_
    canthariasis,
  6. BEETLES
    whereas invasion of such tissues by adult beetles is called
    s_
    scarabiasis.
  7. BEETLES
    Most clinical cases involve enteric canthariasis that results from the

    ingestion of _
    • ingestion of foodstuffs infested with beetles or the accidental
    • ingestion of infested materials by children.
  8. BEETLES
    Dermestid larvae, such as those of Trogoderma glabrum and
    T. ornatum, have been associated with enteric canthariasis
    in infants who showed signs of extreme
    digestive discomfort, which in one case was the result of ulcerative colitis.
  9. BEETLES
    Larvae were recovered from the
    stools of these patients and from the dry cereal they ingested.
  10. BEETLES
    Small beetles in various families have been known to fly or crawl into

    fly or crawl into human eyes and ears.
  11. BEETLES
    BLANK AND BLANK are most often affected by inhalational allergies, because most of the
    beetle species involved occur in large numbers in stored products.
    Agricultural and research workers
  12. BEETLES
    Dermestid beetles (Trogoderma angustum), tenebrionids (Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium spp.), and
    grain weevils (Sitophilus granarius) have been incriminated in many cases of
    respiratory distress, such as asthma.
  13. BEETLES
    Beetles serve as intermediate hosts for more than 50
    • parasitic worms, including tapeworms (Cestoda), flukes
    • (Trematoda), roundworms (Nematoda), and thorny-headed
    • worms (Acanthocephala) (Hall, 1929; Cheng, 1973).
  14. BEETLES
    Only a few species, such as the rodent tapeworms
    Hymenolepis nana and H. diminuta, and the Macracanthorhynchus
    species of acanthocephalan parasites, occasionally infest BLANK
    children.
  15. BEETLES
    Many beetles, such as scarabs, silphids, and dermestids,
    that feed on
    dung and carrion
  16. BEETLES
    have the potential to be mechanical vectors of pathogens, such as the bacilli that
    can cause BLANK AND BLANK
    salmonellosis and anthrax.
  17. DERMESTID BEETLES
    Larvae of larder beetles, or pantry beetles (Fig. 9.8), are
    covered with BLANK AND BLANK that may cause
    allergic reactions in the form of pruritic, papulovesicular skin lesions.
    barbed and spearlike setae
  18. DERMESTID BEETLES
    Dermestid larvae often are found living in INTERIOR AREAS
    • household furnishings, such as carpets, rugs, and upholstery or stored clothing of individuals suffering from these
    • reactions.
  19. DERMESTID BEETLES
    Dermestid larvae and adults are known to have crawled into
    crawled into human ears, causing itching and pain.
  20. BLISTER BEETLES
    contain the terpene cantharidin, which can cause
    skin irritations.
  21. BLISTER BEETLES
    People usually develop
    blisters within 24 h of contacting the secretions of these beetles or the body fluids from crushed
  22. BLISTER BEETLES
    Cantharidin is present in the hemolymph and in the clear, yellow secretion that is exuded at the INSECT BODY PARTS
    joints of the legs of these beetles by reflex bleeding.
  23. BLISTER BEETLES
    ANIMALS are repelled by the fluid.
    Reptiles and some predaceous insects
  24. BLISTER BEETLES
    Although cantharidin is irritating to humans, the chemical acts as a
    meloid courtship stimulant that is secreted by male accessory glands and passed to the female during copulation.
  25. BLISTER BEETLES
    BLANK - being the only source of cantharidin, generally have the highest concentrations of the chemical
    males
  26. BLISTER BEETLES
    Cantharidin is poisonous to humans and other animals when ingested and may cause BLANK AND BLANK
    ingested and may cause kidney damage and death.
  27. BLISTER BEETLES
    Blister beetles are found often on
    flowers or foliage where the beetles feed on pollen and other plant tissues and where they are near the nests of solitary bees that serve as hosts for the larvae of many species.
  28. BLISTER BEETLES
    Most people who develop blister beetle lesions are
    agricultural workers or soldiers on maneuvers in areas where the beetles are common.
  29. BLISTER BEETLES
    Retention of cantharidin ANIMAL AND ANIMAL
    that prey on meloids may lead to human poisoning when
    these predators are used as human food.
    FROGS AND BIRDS
  30. BLISTER BEETLES
    Humans have also developed signs of cantharidin poisoning following the ingestion of cooked
    wild geese (Eisner et al., 1990).
  31. FALSE BLISTER BEETLES
    False blister beetles in the genera Oxycopis (Fig. 9.4),Oxacis, and Alloxacis are known to cause
    vesicular or bullous dermatitis
  32. FALSE BLISTER BEETLES
    are attracted to
    flowers where they feed on pollen.
Author
ianquinto
ID
351479
Card Set
BEETLES PHE 02
Description
BEETLES PHE 02
Updated