LONE STAR TICK PHE

  1. LONE STAR TICK
    common name from the single BLANK spot located on the female’s dorsal/upper surface at the tip/rear of the scutum (dorsal shield).
    silvery
  2. LONE STAR TICK
    lone star ticks attack BLANK more frequently than any other tick in the REGION
    • humans
    • eastern and southeastern states.
  3. LONE STAR TICK
    it vectors the causal organisms of

    BLANK
    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF),
    ehrlichiosis,
    southern tick-associated rash illness (STAR),
    heartland viral disease,
    and possibly Lyme-like disease,
    tularemia,
  4. LONE STAR TICK
    it vectors the causal organisms of

    tularemia,
    BLANK
    ehrlichiosis,
    southern tick-associated rash illness (STAR),
    heartland viral disease,
    and possibly Lyme-like disease,
    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF),
  5. LONE STAR TICK
    it vectors the causal organisms of

    tularemia,
    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF),
    BLANK
    southern tick-associated rash illness (STAR),
    heartland viral disease,
    and possibly Lyme-like disease,
    ehrlichiosis,
  6. LONE STAR TICK
    it vectors the causal organisms of

    tularemia,
    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF),
    ehrlichiosis,
    BLANK
    heartland viral disease,
    and possibly Lyme-like disease,
    southern tick-associated rash illness (STAR),
  7. LONE STAR TICK
    and is a cause of tick
    paralysis
  8. LONE STAR TICK
    and tick-bite induced
    red meat allergy.
  9. LONE STAR TICK
    male with several inverted SHAPED whitish spots along rear margin.
    horse shoe shaped
  10. LONE STAR TICK
    The totally engorged female
    drops off the host and seeks a sheltered place to lay her eggs.
  11. LONE STAR TICK
    After a preoviposition or waiting period of 5-16 days, she lays an egg mass averaging 3,000-5,000 eggs (range few hundred to 9,000) over 7-23 days, and then
    dies.
  12. LONE STAR TICK
    Larvae BLANK attach to hosts which happen by, feed for 3-9 days to reach engorgement, and drop to the ground. They molt to nymphs (8-legged) in 13-46 days.
    6 legged
  13. LONE STAR TICK
    Egg laying begins in
    early spring by overwintered females and continues into July.
  14. LONE STAR TICK
    Larvae peak in late
    July and August with late feeders overwintering as fed larvae.
  15. LONE STAR TICK
    Adults that emerge after mid-July do not
    feed and overwinter.
  16. LONE STAR TICK
    Larvae, nymphs, and adults enter a non-feeding period in mid to late summer which is apparently triggered by
    decreasing day length.
  17. LONE STAR TICK
    bacterium Francisella tularensis.
    tularemia
  18. LONE STAR TICK
    rickettsial bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii
    RMSF
  19. LONE STAR TICK
    caused by the fluids injected during feeding.
    tick paralysis
  20. LONE STAR TICK
    Southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) whose cause is
    presently unknown (not Borrelia lonestari), is found in the eastern and southeastern United States.
  21. LONE STAR TICK
    probably a vector of BLANK viral disease which is caused by a phlebovirus... but its vector status has yet to be determined.
    Heartland
  22. LONE STAR TICK
    Ehrlichiosis is caused by
    rickettsial bacteria.
  23. LONE STAR TICK
    is caused primarily by Ehrlichia chaffeenis and Ehrlichia ewingii.
    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME)
  24. LONE STAR TICK
    Tick-bite induced red meat allergy is caused by the
    fluids injected by the tick during feeding.
  25. LONE STAR TICK
    Bite of tick can cause a human to develop a meat allergy to
    nonprimate mammalian meat and meat products.
  26. LONE STAR TICK
    Red meat allergy symptoms... a delayed reaction of urticaria (BLANK) or anaphylaxis appearing 4–6 hours after eating red meat.
    hives
  27. LONE STAR TICK
    Red meat allergy symptoms... a delayed reaction of urticaria (hives) or BLANK appearing 4–6 hours after eating red meat.
    anaphylaxis
  28. LONE STAR TICK
    does not survive
    indoors.
  29. LONE STAR TICK
    If found indoors, it was probably
    carried in on a pet or humans and dropped off when fully engorged.
  30. LONE STAR TICK
    nymphs and adults may become stimulated by the
    warmth and carbon dioxide from a host spending considerable time in the area and will drop to the ground, find the host, and climb onto it.
  31. LONE STAR TICK
    Lone star ticks cannot survive long exposure to the
    sun and are therefore typically found in shaded areas.
  32. LONE STAR TICK
    The habitat must also contain both
    small animal hosts for larvae and large animal hosts for adults.
  33. LONE STAR TICK
    A relative humidity of greater than PERCENT is required for egg hatch and larval survival until host attachment.
    65%
  34. LONE STAR TICK
    Favorite habitat is the
    woods to lawn or meadow transitional zone.
  35. LONE STAR TICK
    Small animal larval hosts include
    gray fox (Urocyon), cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus), striped skunk (Mephitis), raccoon (Procyon), cotton rat (Sigmodon), gray squirrel (Sciurus), cat, and ground nesting birds including bobwhite quail and chickens.
  36. LONE STAR TICK
    Nymphs get on many of these same animals as well as
    larger animals typical for adults.
  37. LONE STAR TICK
    Adult hosts include
    foxes (Urocyon), dogs, cats, cattle, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann)), wild turkey, and humans.
  38. LONE STAR TICK
    Humans are attacked by
    all 3 stages.
  39. LONE STAR TICK
    The mouthparts are often broken off during removal which may result in
    secondary infection.
  40. LONE STAR TICK
    pesticide application should be in the
    early spring to reduce the larvae and nymphs which overwintered.
Author
ianquinto
ID
351387
Card Set
LONE STAR TICK PHE
Description
LONE STAR TICK PHE
Updated