Field guide bats

  1. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    are of medical concern because a very small percentage are infected with ,
    rabies
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    old droppings may harbor the fungal organism that causes the lung disease
    histoplasmosis.
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    Note that bat species are difficult to
    identify, even by the experts. If assistance is needed, contact the wildlife or zoology department of a local museum or university, fish and wildlife personnel, or the local health department.
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    Bats have relatively poor
    vision and instead rely on echolocation (similar to sonar) to avoid objects find prey, and to communicate.
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    only a very small percentage of bats are infected with
    rabies,
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    but rabies infected bats may not
    show any symptoms.
  7. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    Rabies can be transmitted when , of another animal including humans;
    saliva or body tissue of an infected animal comes into contact with open wounds or mucous membranes, such as those of the eyes and nose
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    Rabies....it is not necessary to be _ to become infected.
    bitten by a rabid animal
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    The CDC recommends
    pre-exposure rabies immunization for people in occupations that have an increased risk of rabies exposure, especially animal handlers.
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    accumulations of bat droppings in attics or soil create conditions suitable for the growth of
    Histoplasmosis capsulatum, a fungus that can cause the lung disease histoplasmosis.
  11. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    Histoplasmosis infection occurs by breathing spores contained in dust found in
    the roost. In severe cases, histoplasmosis can be fatal.
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    The 3 most common bats to enter structures are
    the big brown, the little brown, and the Mexican free-tailed bat.
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    All 3 of these bats leave their roosts at
    dusk and return just before dawn.
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    Usually their first stop is at a
    stream, pond, or lake for a drink of water and then feeding begins.
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    Bats are
    protected by law in most states.
  16. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    Bat management begins with .
    2 inspections
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    First, inspect at dusk to determine
    exit/entry points and the size of the infestation.
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    This requires a minimum of 2 people at opposite corners to see
    all sides of the roof at once; roofs with wings require more people.
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    The inspection should begin about half an hour before
    dusk and stop an hour after dusk;
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    remember that bats do not fly in
    rainy or unseasonably cold weather.
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    Common exit/entry points include
    attic louvers, roof lines where sheeting and facia boards meet, under facia boards, and other openings due to deterioration.
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    Second, inspect during the day to locate exterior
    structural deficiencies, inside roosting sites (check opposite exit/entry points, wall voids, etc., look for droppings and/or bats), access problems, and to determine equipment needed.
  23. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    Minimum personal protective equipment required before entering a bat roost includes a
    respirator with HEPA filters, coveralls, heavy leather gloves, bright flashlight, and bump cap.
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    is the control method of choice if it is practical and economical.
    Bat proofing
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    is the only method to keep bats out long term.
    Exclusion
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    The best time to bat proof is after the bats have left for
    hibernation in the autumn and before they return in the spring.
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    Summertime bat proofing should only be done after
    mid-August to avoid trapping young;
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    never batproof from early
    May to mid-August.
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    Seal all but
    1 or 2 exit/entry points and all other holes 3/8" (9 mm) or larger.
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    After sealing all but 1 entry points... wait 3-4 days for the bats to adjust. Finally,
    seal those remaining holes some evening just after the bats leave for their night feeding.
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    An alternate way is to install
    one-way bat check valves/cones in the last 1 or 2 entry/exit holes to prevent bat reentry, and then come back several days later to remove the check valves/ cones and seal these last entry/exit holes.
  32. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    If there are just too many potential exit/entry points, installation of
    plastic bird netting should be considered.
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    The use of _ to repel bats only works in confined spaces, but the odor is usually objectionable and it requires repeated applications.
    naphthalene flakes
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    can help, but all dark areas must be illuminated to be effective and total control should not be expected.
    Bright lights
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    have not been found to be effective for repelling bats from structures.
    Ultrasonic devices
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    is illegal and it may result in an increase in the number of contacts with humans and pets in the vicinity.
    Poisoning bats
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    On occasion, if 1 or 2 bats enter a structure, open the doors and windows and turn out the lights. The bats will
    follow the fresh air currents to the outside.
  38. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    If bat control is done, be sure to ULV and/or apply an appropriately labeled residual to the
    roost area to help control the bat ectoparasites, such as mites and bat bugs, which will probably be present.
  39. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    The customers should be advised of the potential health hazard that accumulated
    bat droppings present.
  40. BATS FIELD GUIDE
    These droppings can be
    left alone with access secured, or they can be professionally decontaminated and removed.
Author
ianquinto
ID
350373
Card Set
Field guide bats
Description
Field guide bats
Updated