Field guide starlings

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    are of medical concern because
    more than 25 diseases and ectoparasites have been associated with starlings, their nests, and droppings.
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    Diseases include
    encephalitis, St. Louis, eastern and western equine), histoplasmosis, Newcastle disease, chlamydiosis, and salmonellosis which can affect human and animal health, and severe cases may result in death.
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    The ectoparasites include primarily
    mite species which can bite humans or infest domestic animals, causing extreme discomfort.
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    Other arthropods, such as _ associated with the nests and droppings may invade structures.
    dermestid beetles, clothes moths, and stored product pests,
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    Starlings nest in
    tree cavities, birdhouses, and in almost any hole, nook, or crannie in and around a structure.
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    They often displace
    native hole-nesting birds, such as woodpeckers, bluebirds, flickers, etc.
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    The nest consists of
    grasses, twigs, straw, and debris.
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    Nests are often reused and become foul because
    no sanitation is practiced.
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    They cause serious problems when such massive
    flocks come into urban areas or cities to roost.
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    Starlings not only consume large quantities of animal feed, but foul much of that
    not eaten and can spread livestock diseases, such as hog cholera.
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    They can also cause considerable damage in
    orchards and on small fruit and vegetable farms.
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    Starling control or management begins with the most important step, the
    survey.
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    The survey should address the following:
    location of problem, species observed (starlings/nontargets and numbers), habitat (food, water, nesting sites), special equipment, time constraints, analysis of problem, public relations issues, recommended control procedures, and pricing considerations.
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    The site should be visited on several days when
    typical/normal site activity and weather is occurring.
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    On each day selected, one or more
    visits may be required (sunrise, midday, late afternoon, and/or at dusk), and observations should be recorded with date and time.
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    For instance, if roosting starlings are the problem, then observations are best made just at
    dusk to determine the direction the birds are entering from and where their pre-roosting staging area is located.
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    Once the species involved (starlings and nontargets) are determined via the survey, appropriate
    federal, state, and local regulations should be checked.
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    Starlings are not
    protected by the federal endangered species act or migratory bird statutes, but they may be protected by some states; if the area is a bird sanctuary, then local permits are also required.
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    exclusion which involves
    structural modification (e.g. change ledge angle to 45°), the installation of plastic netting on portions of buildings (denies access to perching and/or roosting sites), and/or the use of repellents such as plastic and metal spines, monofilament and steel lines, and gels and pastes.
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    Second is sanitation which
    involves the reduction or elimination of feeding sites and temporary water sources.
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    The third involves the use of sound devices such as
    noise-making devices and distress calls (usually not suitable for urban areas).
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    There is 1 method of control utilizing chemicals or toxicants. This can be considered a
    chemical frightening agent and involves grain coated with a material that elicits distress symptoms and calls when consumed and results in the remaining portion of the flock being repelled.
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    Chemical frightening agent... use involves a prebaiting program, and the entire cycle may have to be
    repeated if other starlings move in;
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    Chemical frightening agent.... it may be lethal to
    glutton starlings.
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    Chemical frightening agent... If nontarget birds are attracted to this treated grain, then the
    program must be stopped immediately.
Author
ianquinto
ID
350371
Card Set
Field guide starlings
Description
Field guide starlings
Updated