API 571-Temper Embrittlement Prevention/Mitigation Existing Materials

  1. The best way to minimize the likelihood and extent of temper embrittlement is to limit the acceptance levels of manganese, silicon, phosphorus, tin, antimony, and arsenic in the _____________. In addition, ___________ should be specified and carefully controlled.
    • base metal and welding consumables
    • strength levels and PWHT procedures
  2. A common way to minimize temper embrittlement is to limit the "J*" Factor for _______ and the "X" Factor for ________, based on material composition as follows:
    J* = (Si + Mn) x (P + Sn) x 104 {elements in wt%}
    X = (10P + 5Sb + 4Sn + As)/100 {elements in ppm}
    • base metal
    • weld metal
  3. Typical J* and X factors used for _______steel are a maximum of 100 and 15, respectively. Studies have also shown that limiting the ______ to less than 0.01% is sufficient to minimize temper embrittlement because __________ control the rate of embrittlement.
    • 2.25 Cr
    • (P + Sn)
    • (Si + Mn)
  4. A newer and less widely used factor called the___________ has been
    developed for _________ and _________ and is defined as follows is given by:
    P = C + Mn + (Mo Cr) /3 + Si / 4 + 3.5 x [(10 x P + (5 x Sb) + (4 x Sn) + As) {elements in wt%}
    • Equivalent Phosphorus content
    • base metal
    • weld metal
  5. Expert metallurgical advice should be solicited to determine acceptable ___________, as well as appropriate welding, fabricating and heat treating procedures for _____________ and __________ operating in the temper
    embrittlement and/or creep range.
    • composition, toughness and strength levels
    • new low alloy steel heavy wall equipment
    • low alloy equipment
Author
egf4201
ID
349539
Card Set
API 571-Temper Embrittlement Prevention/Mitigation Existing Materials
Description
Prevention/Mitigation Existing Materials
Updated