SPP ACE GUIDE

  1. _ is more efficient than _for killing SPP and fabric pests, but it is not appropriate for all situations.
    Heat is more efficient than cold
  2. Most SPP and fabric pests will be killed at a temp of # degrees Fahrenheit.
    131 degrees F
  3. SPP   heat can also be used in combination with _ or other fumigants to speed control.
    carbon dioxide
  4. SPP    disinfestation of valuable items can be accomplished through heat treatment, cold treatment, fumigation, fogging, inert gasses (like _ ) or other pesticide treatments
    carbon dioxide
  5. SPP    cold treatment. freezing at # deg F, for two weeks.
    0 deg F
  6. SPP    cold treatment. freezing at # deg F, for seven days.
    -13 deg F
  7. SPP    cold treatment. freezing at # deg F, for three days is sufficient for killing most insects and eggs.
    22 deg F
  8. SPP    _ effectively kills all stages of fabric pests.
    dry cleaning
  9. SPP   dust times live in _, _, and _ _.
    mattresses, pillows, and upholstered furniture
  10. SPP   dust mites do not bite, but their _ and _ can be found in house dust, where they can be come allergens.
    • feces
    • cast sking/exuviae
  11. SPP    dust mites are very sensitive to low humidity and do not thrive under #% humidity.
    50%
  12. SILVERFISH/FIREBRATS   continue to _ throughout their entire lives, even in the adult stage when they are sexually mature.
    molt
  13. Although _ are able to digest cellulose, they almost never eat newsprint, cardboard, or brown wrapping paper.
    silverfish
  14. They will feed on linen, cotton, and lisle, but silk and wool are rarely eaten by them.
    silverfish
  15. SILVERFISH/FIREBRATS   prefer to feed on _ _, such as those found in glue and dead arthropods, and they can seriously damage book bindings and wallpaper.
    animal proteins
  16. BOOKLICE   do not feed on _ or _ .
    people or animals
  17. PSOCIDS/BOOKLICE   may resemble _ with a pale body and thorax that is narrower than the head and abdomen.`
    termite workers
  18. PSOCIDS/BOOKLICE    metamorphosis =
    gradual
  19. PSOCIDS/BOOKLICE   feed on microscopic _ .
    molds
  20. PSOCIDS/BOOKLICE   require a _ _ _ _ in order to survive
    high level of humidity
  21. PSOCIDS/BOOKLICE   reducing air moisture levels to less than #% is an effective method of physical control.
    58%
  22. adults are a common insect outdoors where feed on pollen.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Carpet beetles
  23. sometimes they are attracted to bird and animal nests in soffits and attics.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Carpet beetles
  24. They reproduce on rugs, clothing items, feathers, cracked/dried eggs, old rodent baits, dead birds in and around bird nesting.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Carpet beetles
  25. ... infestations can be difficult to solve because of the many things that attract them and variety of foods they eat.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Carpet beetles
  26. the larvae build galleries out of silk as they burrow into items on they feed, which includes coarse fabrics, carpets, furs, and feathers.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Carpet moths
  27. the larvae carry a silken, tube like case throughout their development, which makes them easily recognizable.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Casemaking clothes moths
  28. will feed on wool, tobacco, spices, and almonds.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Casemaking clothes moths
  29. The larvae spin silken cocoons once they reach pupal stage, which they usually attach to damaged fabric on which they feed.

    Webbing clothes moths. Casemaking clothes moths. Carpet moths. Carpet beetles.
    Webbing clothes moth
  30. Clothes moth larvae known to feed on the dessicated bodies of _ .
    dead rodents
  31. Many species of clothes moths do not _
    fly
  32. Secondary feeders infest grain products that are _ or _
    rotten or moldy
  33. Secondary feeders infest grain products that are rotten or moldy, and are usually indicators of _ and/or _.
    • poor sanitation
    • excessive moisture
  34. _ are insects that feed and develop entirely within kernels of whole grains or seeds during immature stages.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Internal feeders
  35. can be highly destructive of stored food because they are difficult to detect and manage

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Internal feeders
  36. typically damage only one seed or grain during their development, but in high numbers they can be extremely damaging.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Internal feeders
  37. the larvae develop outside of whole grain kernels.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  38. they are capable of feeding on both whole grains and on processed grains.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  39. one insect may damage numerous grains in the course of its development.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  40. only attack grains that have been processed or damaged by other insects that have previously fed on them.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Scavengers
  41. they are not normally found in whole grains.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Scavengers
  42. infest grain products that are rotten or moldy.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Secondary pests
  43. Lepidoptera means _ _
    scaly wings
  44. MOTHS SPP no butterflies are considered pests because they feed on _
    plants outdoors
  45. MOTHS SPP _ are short lived and cause little to no feeding damage
    adults
  46. MOTHS SPP larvae/caterpillars, mouthparts =
    chewing
  47. MOTHS SPP the presence of _ and _ residues can be a sign of infestation.
    • cocoon
    • silk
  48. MOTHS SPP when identifying _ _ , the shape and orientation of the labial palps and the tufts of hair on top of the head are useful identification features.
    clothes moths
  49. MOTHS SPP when identifying clothes moths, the _ and _ of the labial palps and the tufts of hair on top of the head are useful identification features.
    the shape and orientation
  50. MOTHS SPP when identifying clothes moths, the shape and orientation of the _ _ and the tufts of hair on top of the head are useful identification features.
    labial palps
  51. MOTHS SPP when identifying clothes moths, the shape and orientation of the labial palps and the tufts of _ on top of the head are useful identification features.
    hair
  52. MOTHS SPP caterpillars/larvae have pseudo legs called _
    prolegs
  53. MOTHS SPP caterpillars/larvae have pseudo legs called prolegs. Each proleg has a series of hooks called _
    crochets
  54. SPP weevils

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    Internal feeders
  55. SPP they are easily recognizable by an elongate proboscis/snout and the clubbed antennae that arise from its sides.

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Weevils
  56. SPP the larva hatches and pupates inside the kernel, and when it reaches the adult stage chews a round exit hole and emerges.

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Weevils
  57. SPP they may also attack pasta products

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Weevils
  58. SPP rarely attack finely ground flour or cornmeal

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Weevils
  59. SPP cannot fly and are not attracted to lights

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Granary weevils
  60. SPP these are internal feeders on whole beans and peas only.

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Bruchines
  61. SPP these internal feeders eat dried beans

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Bean weevils
  62. SPP they feed on cowpeas, mung beans, garden beans, and other legumes.

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Cowpea weevils
  63. SPP larvae feed on whole grains of barley, rye, corn, oats, rice.

    Rice weevils. Granary weevils. Bruchines. Bean weevils. Cowpea weevils. Angumois grain moths.
    Angumois grain moths
  64. SPP develop outside of whole grain kernels, but are capable of feeding on both whole grains and processed grain products.

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  65. SPP attracted to lights and able to fly.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Drugstore beetles
  66. SPP they infest pet food, cereals, drugs, peppers, spices, dried, fruits, flour, and pasta

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Drugstore beetles
  67. SPP will also eat leather, dried fish, and dead insects.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Drugstore beetles
  68. SPP are attracted to lights.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Cigarette beetles
  69. SPP they infest pet food, cereals, tobacco, peppers, spices, dried fruits, seeds, flour, and pasta.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Cigarette beetles
  70. SPP will also eat leather, dried fish, and dead insects.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Cigarette beetles
  71. SPP in the home, dry dog food and paprika are most commonly attacked.

    Anobiine beetles. Drugstore beetles. Cigarette beetles.
    Cigarette beetles
  72. CARPET BEETLES larvae have clumps of _ (spear headed hairs) arising between the plates on the last three segments of the abdomen.
    hastisetae
  73. CARPET BEETLES larvae have clumps of hastisetae (spear headed hairs) arising between the plates on the last three segments of the _ .
    abdomen
  74. CARPET BEETLES hastisetae can affect _ _
    human health
  75. CARPET BEETLES live insects with _ and their cast skins can cause gastrointestinal irritation if ingested with food.
    hastisetae
  76. CARPET BEETLES mild to severe allergic reactions to hastisetae may also occur if they are _ or _ , sometimes resulting in anaphylaxis
    ingested or inhaled
  77. Drugstore beetles

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  78. Carpet beetles

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  79. Hide and Larder Beetles

    Internal feeders. External feeders. Scavengers. Secondary pests.
    External feeders
  80. SPP outdoors, they are part of nature's clean up crew

    Hide/Larder beetles. Warehouse beetles. Khapra beetle. Lesser grain borers. Red legged ham beetles. Cadelles.
    Hide/Larder beetles
  81. SPP often used by museums for the cleaning of bones and skulls for collections and exhibits.

    Hide/Larder beetles. Warehouse beetles. Khapra beetle. Lesser grain borers. Red legged ham beetles. Cadelles.
    Hide/Larder beetles
  82. SPP have hastisetae which can cause gastrointestinal problems if ingested by humans.

    Hide/Larder beetles. Warehouse beetles. Khapra beetle. Lesser grain borers. Red legged ham beetles. Cadelles.
    Warehouse beetles
  83. SPP the Warehouse beetle is close relative of a highly destructive and tightly quaratined pest called the _ beetle.
    Khapra beetle
  84. SPP if Trogoderma/Warehouse beetles are discovered in a shipment from a foreign country known to have _ beetles, they should be sent immediately to a USDA lab for identification.
    Khapra
  85. SPP if Trogoderma/Warehouse beetles are discovered in a shipment from a foreign country known to have Khapra beetles, they should be sent immediately to a _ lab for identification.
    USDA
  86. SPP primary larval foods are whole wheat, corn, rice, and millet in storage.

    Hide/Larder beetles. Warehouse beetles. Khapra beetle. Lesser grain borers. Red legged ham beetles. Cadelles.
    Lesser grain borers
  87. SPP primarily feed on cured meats and cheese

    Hide/Larder beetles. Warehouse beetles. Khapra beetle. Lesser grain borers. Red legged ham beetles. Cadelles.
    Red legged ham beetles
Author
ianquinto
ID
349442
Card Set
SPP ACE GUIDE
Description
SPP ACE GUIDE
Updated