Intro trauma

  1. What is MTC and what are the main ones on london?
    • Major Trauma Centre 
    • St Mary's
    • St George's 
    • Kings 
    • Royal London
  2. HEMS immediate dispatch- 3 minutes
    • One under- train
    • Fall >2 floors (>20 feet) 
    • ejected from vehicle 
    • trapped under vehicle (not motorcycle)
    • death of same vehicle occupant 
    • traumatic amputations above wrist or above ankle 
    • other emergency service request
  3. HEMS interrogation dispatch- 7 minutes to dispatch
    • Fall from height <2 floor 
    • RTCs
    • Entrapment 
    • impaled on an object
    • amputations 
    • stabbings/ shooting 
    • burns/ scalds
    • electrocution 
    • industrial accidents
    • building site accidents 
    • explosions 
    • hangings drowning
  4. Why is the trauma tree used?
    to ensure the patients are appropriately transported to a major trauma centre
  5. What is MOI?
    • mechanism of injury
    • physical force that is exerted on the body which results in an injury
  6. what percentage of information about MOI do you get from obs and history taking?
    • 80% of information from history taking 
    • 20% of information from obs
  7. what are the types of MOI?
    • fall from standing/sitting/height
    • abnormal flexion/extension/rotation of joints (whiplash or C-spine) 
    • blunt trauma (deceleration and compression force) 
    • penetrating trauma 
    • entrapment
  8. what are 2 significant mechanisms?
    • fall >6m/2 stories in adults or
    • fall >3m/2 times height of child 
    • entrapment (relative and absolute)
  9. What are significant mechanisms with relation to a motor vehicle?
    • intrusion >30cm on occupants side 
    • Ejection from vehicle 
    • death in same passenger compartment 
    • motorcycle crash >20mph 
    • pedestrian/cyclist  vs. motor vehicle >20mph
  10. Who should you have special considerations for who have a lower resilience to trauma?
    • patient aged >55
    • patient's taking anti- coagulants (e.g. warfarin) 
    • pregnant patients >20 weeks 
    • patients on dialysis 
    • burns- full thickness facial/ circumferential or >20%
    • paediatrics <12 
    • your judgement
  11. what speed do airbags go off?
    15 mph
  12. how do you work out kinetic energy?
    kinetic energy= 1/2 m x v squared 

    1/2 70 (kg) x 30 squared (mph)

    35 x 900 = 31,500
  13. where does the energy dissipated in car crash?
    through crumple zones before passenger compartment
  14. what should you also take into account when it comes to RTC?
    • angle of impact 
    • difference size of vehicles involved 
    • restraints used (seat belts) 
    • safety mechanisms deployed (airbags)
  15. what is triage?
    • to sort 
    • categorising patients based on severity 
    • prioritise care accordingly
  16. what is step 1 of triage sieve?
    • shout "if you are injured and able to walk, come towards me"
    • these patients cat 3
  17. what is step 2 of triage sieve?
    continue to incident site- use triage sieve giving patients an appropriate priority tag
  18. what should be person 1 doing in triage?
    • assessing patient 
    • physiological signs 
    • catastrophic haemorrhage control 
    • airway maintenance
  19. what should person 2 be doing in triage?
    • stood up collecting data 
    • putting priority tags on patients 
    • keep tally of casualties
    • maintains safety 
    • make sure patients aren't missed 
    • liaises with triage officer
  20. what label would you put on a patient after assessing them?
    • either:
    • priority 1
    • priority 2
    • priority 3
    • dead
  21. what is triage sort?
    • 2nd stage of triage 
    • more in depth 
    • RR
    • systolic BP 
    • GCS
  22. what are the 2 stages of triage?
    • Sieve 
    • Sort
  23. what tool is there to triage paediatrics?
    triage tape
  24. what height or weight should you triage as an adult?
    • >140cm
    • >32kg
  25. What is SCENE and when should it be used?
    • assessing initial trauma scene
    • Safety 
    • Cause (MOI) 
    • Environment 
    • Number of patients 
    • Extra resources needed
  26. what is METHANE and when should it be used?
    • provide initial communication and details at a major incident 
    • Major incident declared 
    • Exact location 
    • Type of incident 
    • Hazards known or potential 
    • Access and egress for vehicles 
    • Number of casualties 
    • Emergency services required
  27. what is a windscreen report?
    • press priority on airway radio 
    • give EOC your call sign and CAD number 
    • tell them exactly what you see 
    • follow with a METHANE report
  28. What is ATMIST and when should it be used?
    • handover trauma 
    • Age
    • Time of incident 
    • Mechanism 
    • Injuries 
    • Signs and Symptoms 
    • Treatment given/immediate needs
  29. what is CATMIST and when should it be used?
    • Trauma blue call 
    • Call sign/CAD
    • Age
    • Time of incident 
    • Mechanism 
    • Injuries found
    • Signs- Vital 
    • Treatment given
  30. What does SBAR stand for?
    • Situation 
    • Background 
    • Assessment 
    • Recommendations, requests and read back
  31. In SBAR, what do you include for situation?
    • identify yourself and where you are calling from
    • identify the patient that you are calling about 
    • briefly describe your concern
  32. In SBAR, what do you include for background?
    • give the reason for the 999 call
    • explain the significant and relevant medical and drug history 
    • consider the relevant family and social circumstances
  33. In SBAR, what do you include for assessment?
    • current vital signs 
    • describe physical findings on examination 
    • including pertinent findings
  34. In SBAR, what do you include for rec recommendations, requests and read back?
    • explain what you think the patient needs 
    • make suggestions not demands 
    • be specific about time frame and patient expectations
Author
davidgoddard93
ID
345416
Card Set
Intro trauma
Description
Intro trauma
Updated