Acidosis/Alkalosis

  1. When an basic/acidic amino acid is in a basic pH is it depronated or protonated?
    deprotoned
  2. When an basic/acidic amino acid is in a acidic pH is it depronated or protonated?
    protonated
  3. what is the most important primary and quarternary structure amine and whats its pka?
    • primary: ethanolamine, pka = 9.5
    • quarternary: choline, pka 13.9
  4. what is phosphatidylcholin and where is it found
    • a protein with a phosphate group and choline
    • found as an amphiphilic compound
  5. What is the buffering equation for bicarbonate
    • Image Upload 1
    • HCO3 can is absorbed by the kidney
    • CO2 is expired by the lungs
  6. what is a buffer and its importance in the body
    • a compound that when at or near their pKa, both weak acids and weak bases will resist changes in pH
    • allows the body to adapt to rapid pH changes
  7. describe the buffering capacity of bicarbonate
    • When CO2 is added to the system it binds with H2O and forms carbonic acid (H2CO3). H2CO3 is unstable and then degrades into H+ and bicarbonate (HCO3).
    • the kidneys absorb HCO3 as needed
    • CO2 is expired by the lungs as needed
    • The formation of carbonic acid is slow, and is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase.
  8. if pCO2 and pH are in different direction
    respiratory defect
  9. if pCO3 and pH are in the same direction
    metabolic defect
  10. whats the direction of the bicarbonate equilibrium when shifted in respiratory failure
    • respiratory failure will lead to an increase in CO2 in the body, therefore causing a right shift in the body.
    • right shift will increase production of HCO3
  11. whats the direction of the bicarbonate equilibrium when shifted in hyperventilation
    Hyperventilation will lead to a decrease in CO2 therefore a left shift will occur where the body will produce less HCO3
Author
tanyalequang
ID
342605
Card Set
Acidosis/Alkalosis
Description
acidity and basicity
Updated