LSAT Argument Categories

  1. Question Stem Contains
    • Proceeds by...
    • Method of reasoning...
    • Argumentative technique...
    • Claim plays what role...
    • X responds to Y by...
    • Reasoning (Question Type)
  2. Question Stem Contains 
    • Resolve...
    • Explain... 
    • Paradox... 
    • Discrepancy...
    • Puzzling Situation...
    • Explanation
    • Resolve/Explain (Question Type)
  3. Question Stem Contains
    • Evaluate...
    • Answer to which question would allow you to judge the validity of the argument...
    • Evaluate (Question Type)
  4. Question Stem Contains
    • Must be true...
    • Strongly supported...
    • Is compatible... 
    • What can be concluded...
    • Inference (Question Type)
  5. Question Stem Contains
    • Point at issue...
    • Disagree about...
    • Point at Issue (Question Type)
  6. Question Stem Contains
    • Main point...
    • Main conclusion...
    • structured to lead to which conclusion...
    • Main Point (Question Type)
  7. Question Stem Contains
    • Conforms most closely...
    • Principle...
    • Proposition...
    • Correct application...
    • Principle-Match (Question Type)
  8. Question Stem Contains
    • Pattern of reasoning...
    • Logical features...
    • Most similar...
    • Most parallel...
    • Parallel (Question Type)
  9. Question Stem Contains
    • Assumption required...
    • Depends on...
    • Is assumed...
    • Necessary Assumption (Question Type)
  10. Question Stem Contains
    • Vulnerable to criticism...
    • Error in reasoning...
    • Flaw (Question Type)
  11. Question Stem Contains
    • Most strengthens...
    • Most supports...
    • Justifies...
    • Strengthen (Question Type)
  12. Question Stem Contains
    • Undermines...
    • Calls into question...
    • Most weakens...
    • Weaken (Question Type)
  13. Question Stem Contains
    • Principle, if valid...
    • Most justifies... 
    • Most validates...
    • Principle-Strengthen (Question Type)
  14. Question Stem Contains
    • If assumed...
    • Conclusion follows logically...
    • Conclusion properly drawn...
    • Sufficient Assumption (Question Type)
  15. Premises: list problem
    • Conclusion: "should/ought"
    • Solve (Purpose)
    • Assumption: Solution will work completely
    • Assumption: Solution won't cause a new problem
  16. "Many (stupid) people think..."
    • Premise: evidence for counter-belief
    • Conclusion: people are wrong/might be wrong
    • Disagree (Purpose)
    • Assumption: Both situations can't be true at the same time
  17. No problem listed, no stupid people listed
    • Interpret (Purpose)
    • Everything that isn't Solve/Disagree
    • Most of the LSAT
  18. Correlation in the premises
    • Causal (Pattern; Argument OR Flaw)
    • Assumption: Correlation = Causality
    • Assumption: No Outside Cause
    • Assumption: No Reverse Causality
  19. Conditional statements in premises
    • Necessary vs. Sufficient (Pattern; Flaw)
    • Flaw: Usually reads the arrow backwards
    •      X --> Y flaw is that Y --> X in conclusion
  20. Premises mention a study/poll/survey
    • Survey/Samples (Pattern; Argument OR Flaw)
    • Assumption: Sample is representative of the population discussed in the conclusion
  21. Compares: 
    • 2 Things
    • 2 Time Periods
    • Part-to-Whole
    • Comparison (Pattern; Argument OR Flaw)
    • Assumption: the 2 things being compared can be compared in all relevant ways
  22. Statistics in the Premises
    • Statistics (Patterns; Argument OR Flaw)
    • Often confuse % with absolute values
    • Often misinterpret statistics
  23. Something not proven false must be true
    • Something not proven true must be false
    • Absence of Evidence (Pattern; Flaw)
    • Assumption: if something isn't proven one way, it must be the other
  24. Appeals/Attacks the person, not the argument
    • Appeals/Attacks (Pattern; Flaw)
    • Ignores the merit of the argument, focusing on the merit of the person introducing it instead
  25. Uses a phrase or word that has two meanings as if it only has one
    • Shifting Meanings (Pattern; Flaw)
    • "Trades on ambiguity" 
    • "Equivocates with respect to a key term"
  26. Premise and Conclusion are exactly the same
    • Circular (Pattern; Flaw)
    • "Presumes what it sets out to prove" 
    • "Conclusion merely restates the premises"
Author
Falynn
ID
327518
Card Set
LSAT Argument Categories
Description
Categories for LSAT argument types
Updated