Anesthesia3- Injectables

  1. What are desired characteristics for an injectable protocol? (9)
    • predictable, repeatable effects
    • one small volume IM injection
    • rapid onset, suitable duration
    • predictable rapid recovery time
    • all drug components reversible
    • CVS and resp stability
    • excellent muscle relaxation
    • excellent analgesia
    • excellent hypnosis
  2. Injectable anesthetic protocols are useful for ___________.
    healthy young animals
  3. Older animals or those with organ system compromise are best anesthetized using...
    • an inhalant-based general anesthetic protocol becuse it provides enriched oxygen supplementation, intubation, and the ability to control or assist ventilation
    • inhalants also allow rapid recovery and minimal drug metabolization (almost all of it it exhaled)
  4. Ideally, you will ______________ with injectable anesthetic protocols because...
    intubate and provide oxygen; most injectable protocols are associated with transient moderate to severe hypoventilation (resp acidosis and hypoxemia)
  5. The majority of injectable anesthetic protocols involve __________ or ___________ with other drugs to improve __(2)__.
    • ketamine or telazol
    • analgesia and muscle relaxation (alpha-2 and/ or opioid)
  6. What are options of protocols for feline injectable anesthesia? (4)
    • telazol/ xylazine/ ketamine: "kitty magic", can immobilize a very fractious cat, need to try and get accurate body weight or else prolonged recoveries
    • dexmedetomidine/ ketamine/ morphine: can be reversed with antisedan
    • dexmedetomidine/ alfaxalone/ opioid: alfaxalone has fewer side effects than ketamine, can reverse with antisedan
    • tealzol/ torbugesic (butorphanol)/ dexmedetomidine: greater dose causes profound CNS depression and longer recovery times--> get an accurate weight or it could be bad! (these doses are very concentrated), consider reversing dex with antisedan
  7. What are options for protocols for canine injectable anesthesia? (2)
    • dexmedetomidine/ ketamine/ morphine: can reverse with antisedan
    • tealzol/ torbugesic (butorphanol)/ dexmedetomidine: greater dose causes profound CNS depression and longer recovery times--> get an accurate weight or it could be bad! (these doses are very concentrated), consider reversing dex with antisedan
  8. What are principals of using atipamezole (antisedan)? (2)
    • administer IM (not IV because will cause profound vasodilation and hypotension- alpha 2 blocker)
    • used at an equal volume to that of dexdetomidine
  9. What are principals of pediatric spay and neuter anesthesia? (6)
    • fast less than 2-4 hours
    • provide body temperature support
    • lower dosages of injectables (liver function not mature, can't metabolize)
    • reverse injectables
    • hand feed right after recovery
    • provide dextrose for blood glucose support
  10. What provides the most potent restraint of aggressive dogs/ cats?
    typically those using dexmedetomidine plus ketamine or telazol (disadvantage to this is inability to reverse the dissociatives)
  11. What injectable protocol is useful for excitable/ cage aggressive/ or fearful dogs (not so much for truly aggressive dogs)?
    acepromazine + morphine
  12. What protocols are useful for aggressive dogs and cats? (2)
    • dexmedetomidine/ ketamine/ morphine: dex can be reversed
    • telazol/ butorphanol/ dexmedetomidine: be careful to get accurate weight so you don't cause profound CNS depression with these concentrated drugs
Author
Mawad
ID
326210
Card Set
Anesthesia3- Injectables
Description
vetmed anesthesia3
Updated