Pathophys Test 2

  1. If you patient had history of diverticular disease but at present there was not an acute inflammatory condition, what dietary recommendations would you make and why? (p.27)
    • High fiber diet - increase transit through GI tract
    • Wheat bran, fruits, vegetables, legumes
    • Women = 25g/day, Men = 38g/day
  2. Clinical manifestations of Appendicitis (p.31)
    • Epigastric, periumbilical, cramping pain
    • - may be diffuse
    • - initially RLQ
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Low-grade fever
    • Pain shifting to RLQ with point tenderness
  3. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (p.27)
    • Term used for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
    • Common features:
    • - inflammation of bowel
    • - no proven causal agent
    • - pattern of familial occurrence
    • - systemic manifestation
  4. How does Crohn’s contribute to malabsorption, malnutrition, and weight loss? (p.27-28)
    • Any portion of GI tract may be affected - most often small intestine and colon
    • Transmural - all 3 layers of bowel involved
    • Segments of inflamed tissue separated by normal tissue - cobblestone and patchy - interferes with absorption leading to malnutrition and weight loss
  5. What is distinction between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis based on anatomic localization and histologic appearance? (p.29)
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  6. Identify symptoms and theories of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). (p.29)
    • Symptoms:
    • - chronic abdominal pain - crampy sensations with periodic exacerbations
    • - associated with episodes of diarrhea and constipation
    • Theories:
    • - visceral hypersensitivity
    • - abnormal GI motility (esp. colon)
    • - emotional stress
    • - cholecystectomy (perpetual drip of bile into duodenum)
  7. What are the risk factors, sign/symptoms of Celiac disease? (p.34)
    • Risk factors - genetic predisposition – HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 gene alleles
    • Signs and symptoms:
    • - Chronic diarrhea
    • - Abdominal distention
    • - Painful stomach bloating
    • - Foul-smelling stools
    • - Fatigue, extreme lethargy
    • - Weight loss
    • - Muscle wasting
    • - Vomiting
    • - Irritability
    • - Children – not grow normally, not absorbing nutrients
  8. What is the pathogenic process considered to initiate intestinal damage in Celiac disease?
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  9. If you suspected celiac disease in your patient, what initial test would be most appropriate to perform?
    • Serologic screening for IgA transglutaminase antibody test (IgATTG)
    • Followed by endoscopic biopsy of duodenal mucosa
  10. Once confirmed, what is the treatment for celiac disease?
    • Lifetime gluten-free diet
    • CAN eat: fish, chicken, milk, veggies, corn, rice, eggs, fresh meats, unprocessed cheeses, dry beans, fruits
Author
cgordon05
ID
12104
Card Set
Pathophys Test 2
Description
Intestines
Updated